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    We would like to thank the Wells Fargo Foundation for their generous gift of $1,000.00. This gift will be used to provide shelf stable meals for participants to eat in case of inclement weather during the winter. Read More
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Dec 26 2012

Home Delivered Meals Keep Seniors In Their Homes!

meals1.jpgMany older adults need only a little support to stay in their homes, but when that isn’t available they can end up in an expensive nursing home where they don’t need most of the available services. According to a new study, states that invest more in delivering meals to seniors’ homes have lower rates of such “low-care” seniors in nursing homes, after adjusting for several other factors.

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] — The more states spend on home-delivered meals under the Older Americans Act, the more likely they are to help people who don’t need nursing home care to stay in their homes, according to a newly published Brown University statistical analysis of a decade of spending and nursing home resident data.

“Despite efforts to rebalance long-term care, there are still many nursing home residents who have the functional capacity to live in a less restrictive environment,” wrote gerontology researchers Kali Thomas and Vincent Mor in the journal Health Services Research. “States that have invested in their community-based service networks, particularly home-delivered meals, have proportionally fewer of these people than do those states that have not.”

Nationwide in 2009, 12.6 percent of nursing home residents were considered “low-care,” meaning they did not need much of the suite of services that a nursing home provides. That proportion had declined from 17.9 percent in 2000 because of a variety of efforts, including OAA programs as well as Medicaid-sponsored home- and community-based services (HCBS).

Meals2But the percentages every year vary widely between the states. A major reason for that state-to-state variation turns out to be the difference that home-delivered meals can make. The researchers wrote that their analysis boils down to this ratio: For every $25 per year per older adult above the national average that states spend on home-delivered meals, they could reduce their percentage of low-care nursing home residents compared to the national average by 1 percentage point.

Thomas and Mor’s calculations didn’t merely associate each state’s meals spending with its percentage of low-care residents in nursing homes. They also statistically controlled for the overall decline over time and a wide variety of factors that might also have affected the rates. Those factors included state spending on Medicaid HCBS, as well as a variety of long-term care market pressures, such as excess capacity or nursing home reimbursement rates, that could create incentives for nursing homes in different states to pursue or forgo relatively profitable low-care residents.

The data included state spending on OAA programs and performance information from each state between 2000 and 2009 as well as variety of public health and nursing home data sources compiled by Brown University’s Shaping Long-Term Care in America Project. In all, 16,030 nursing homes were included in the research.

After all the analysis, home-based meals, which served more than 868,000 people in fiscal 2010, emerged as the only statistically significant factor among OAA programs that affected state-to-state differences in low-care nursing home population. Home-delivered meals account for the bulk of OAA spending.

Other factors keeping low-care residents out of nursing homes in some states included a high proportion of residents receiving skilled nursing care, which provides nursing homes with higher revenues. Factors that drove more low-care residents of some states into homes included high nursing home capacity and a high percentage of residents with not-so-lucrative Medicaid funding.

Meals mean a lot

Lead author Thomas said that as a Rhode Island Meals on Wheels volunteer and the granddaughter of a Meals on Wheels beneficiary, she was not surprised to see that the program has such a significant impact.

meals3Until her grandmother died in October, she was able to live at home despite suffering from macular degeneration that made it impossible for her to cook.

“My 98-year-old granny was able to remain at home, independent in her house until she died, and we have always, even before I did this research, attributed that to Meals on Wheels,” Thomas said. “She lived four hours away from any family and refused to leave her house. We had comfort in knowing that every day someone was in her house to see how things are.”

Drivers, after all, not only bring food every day but also observe the condition of their clients. If the elderly beneficiary doesn’t answer a delivery, drivers report that. The volunteers therefore provide food and a “safety check” for many older adults.

For retired journalist and state worker Bill McNamara, 90, of Warwick, R.I., Meals on Wheels helps because he and his wife Catherine, also 90, have developed arthritis in recent years that makes food preparation too difficult. Since 2009 they have lived in an in-law unit of their son’s house, but because his son and daughter-in-law both work, McNamara said, asking them to prepare all their meals would be a significant burden.

Instead, Meals on Wheels of Rhode Island provides that service, McNamara said. The food is great and the drivers work hard to ensure consistent and timely delivery, he said. They even faithfully worked around the recent obstacle of the road being closed for a time.

“We feel it’s even better than we would have anticipated,” McNamara said. “We look forward to hearing the bell ring.”

For many seniors, especially those who don’t live with such a supportive family like the McNamaras, research shows that meal delivery is what allows them to remain where the ring of the doorbell is for their own door.

The National Institute on Aging (grant PO1AG027296) and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (grant 5T32HS000011) supported the research.

 
Editors: Brown University has a fiber link television studio available for domestic and international live and taped interviews, and maintains an ISDN line for radio interviews.
Oct 04 2012

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2012 - Volunteer of The Year!

Michael Delonnay has been volunteering in a leadership capacity for Community Nutrition Network (CNNSSA) since January of 2007. As President of the Senior Nutrition Advisory Council (SNAC), an advisory board to the Community and Economic Development Association of Cook County (CEDA), Michael presides over meetings concerning senior nutrition. He was elected to the position by the SNAC members and has agreed to serve for several terms. As President of SNAC, Michael automatically serves as a member of CNNSSA’s Board of Directors where he currently serves as Treasurer. Also, because Michael represents the senior nutrition arena, he serves on CEDA’s Board of Directors where he is currently on three Committees and a Task Force.

Michaels other volunteer involvement has been with the United States Coast Guard and Auxiliary, the U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Weather Service in Romeoville, and the Arlington Heights Fire Department where he completed the Community Emergency Response Team Training.

Michael has a B.A. degree from Wayne State in Journalism, specializing in Advertising and Public Relations. He was in the U.S. Army between 1958 and 1962 and received the letter of commendation for “Service in the time of Crisis” from Cyrus Vance, Secretary of the Army. Most of Michael’s business career was spent in leadership positions with G.D. Searle and Wyeth Corporation.

He has had a long and distinguished career and believes now that “everyone has an unmet need. Just say ”Yes” to help when you can.” Thank you, Michael, for coming home to roost with us in your golden years. You have impacted many lives by saying “Yes” to us.